Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance

Office of Financial Assistance

Promoting water quality benefits by financing cost-effective and environmentally sound wastewater and drinking water infrastructure improvements and other water resource projects.

Together with the Ohio Water Development Authority (OWDA), we administer the Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) and the Water Supply Revolving Loan Account (WSRLA). We provide specialized assistance to Ohio's small and hardship communities under both programs.

Through the WPCLF, we provide financial and technical assistance to public or private applicants for planning, design and construction of a wide variety of projects to protect or improve the quality of Ohio's water resources. Similarly, through the WSRLA, we assist applicants with projects that address human health and failing drinking water infrastructure needs.

Eligible projects include new drinking water or wastewater infrastructure construction and existing system upgrades, aquatic habitat restoration, home sewage treatment system improvements and agriculture or forestry best management practices to reduce and prevent water pollution.

Documents Available for Review and Comment

WPCLF Documents for Review and Comment

WSRLA Documents for Review and Comment

The Office of Financial Assistance, together with the Ohio Water Development Authority (OWDA), administers two state revolving loan funds (SRFs) in Ohio. We provide specialized assistance to small and hardship communities under both programs.

The Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) program, Ohio’s Clean Water SRF, began in 1988 and finances a variety of projects that have a water quality benefit at their core. Funding point and nonpoint source solutions to Ohio’s water pollution problems is its main purpose, with more than $7 billion having been loaned as of 2016. With assistance from OWDA, DEFA administers this program designed to operate in perpetuity, and to assist Ohio’s communities and citizens with their water resource protection and restoration projects.

The Water Supply Revolving Loan Account (WSRLA), Ohio‘s Drinking Water SRF program, is a part of the larger Drinking Water Assistance Fund (DWAF). Beginning in 1998, its focus is to address human health and failing water treatment and supply needs of private and public entities, with almost $1.2 billion having been loaned as of 2016. DEFA and DDAGW jointly administer this program, also with the assistance of OWDA.

Together, these two programs reflect Ohio EPA’s commitment to fund needed wastewater, other water quality and drinking water infrastructure improvements across our state.

Mission

To benefit Ohio’s water resources, drinking water supplies, and public health by providing lower cost financing, economic incentives, and project assistance statewide for public and private organizations and individuals.

What We Do

DEFA provides financial and technical assistance to public or private applicants for the planning, design and construction of a wide variety of clean water and drinking water projects to protect or improve the quality of Ohio's rivers, streams, lakes and drinking water supplies. We work with other funding agencies to achieve this goal.

Project Coordination Unit

The Project Coordination Unit staff is responsible for providing financial, technical and administrative assistance to the planning, design and implementation of pollution abatement and prevention projects. In cooperation with division staff and project team members, project coordinators proactively schedule and manage all necessary documentation to assure financing is available according to the needs of applicants and in accordance with the requirements of the program. Project coordinators also assist communities in finding additional funding sources, and provide valuable assistance in developing debt retirement and user charge systems with emphasis on long term record-keeping methods.

Environmental Planning Unit

The environmental planners are responsible for conducting comprehensive environmental reviews necessary to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, and applicable state statutes and regulations, including preparation of appropriate environmental documents. Planners perform site inspections to assess direct and indirect environmental impacts, and recommend measures to mitigate adverse impacts for inclusion in project plans, detailed plans and specifications and Ohio Power Siting Board project applications. The planners also help communities by involving the public in the decision making process, determining locally critical environmental attributes and identifying ways to minimize potential adverse environmental impacts of the project.

Environmental Engineering Unit

The project engineers are responsible for performing independent engineering reviews, recommending action (approval, disapproval) or request more information to ensure compliance with state and Federal standards, regulations, policies and procedures. The engineers review detailed plans and specifications for issuance of Permit-to-Install and all subsequent addenda; including evaluation of plans for technical completeness, constructability and assessment of operability and maintenance for publicly owned wastewater treatment plan (POTW) and sewer systems. The engineers are also trained in the latest techniques and can help determine the best and most cost effective solution for various water pollution problems.

Technical Assistance

DEFA recognizes that communities have varying levels of administrative and technical capabilities. The level of expertise available at the local level during project planning, design, and implementation can have a significant effect on the time and effort needed to complete a water pollution control abatement project. In the long-term, communities benefit by understanding how their projects can be most effective during the life of the improvements to ensure that their financial and water quality goals are achieved. DEFA can help the community by providing technical and administrative assistance during the planning and operation of the project.

During planning, DEFA can provide technical assistance for such critical areas as flow evaluation, design standards and appropriate technology. Project engineers, are trained in the latest techniques, can help determine the best and most cost effective solution for various water pollution problems. Environmental planners can help communities by involving the public in the decision making process, determining locally critical environmental attributes, and identifying ways to minimize potential adverse environmental impacts of the project. Project coordinators can assist communities in finding additional funding sources, and provide valuable assistance in developing debt retirement and user charge systems with emphasis on long term record-keeping methods.

The Ohio EPA and the WPCLF cannot assume responsibility for the adequacy of proposed, and operation of constructed, projects. This remains the responsibility of each of our loan recipients. However, we strive to supplement a community's technical and administrative capabilities wherever we can to achieve the consistent, timely and efficient implementation of its funded water pollution abatement projects.

To find out more about how DEFA might be able to provide assistance to you, please contact our offices at (614) 644-3715 or email Jon Bernstein.

The Water Pollution Control Loan Fund program provides financial and technical assistance for improvements to surface and ground water quality, and is administered under Section 6111.036 of the Ohio Revised Code. Rules that support the implementation of parts of the WPCLF may be found at Ohio Administrative Code 3745-150.


Home Sewage Treatment Systems (HSTS)

In addition to our initiative toward providing funds to local health departments and districts to upgrade and replace Home Sewage Treatment Systems (HSTS), we continue to offer linked deposit funding for HSTS upgrades and sewer laterals through participating county health departments. We also will continue to make available to public entities a local loan capitalization program for HSTS improvements, lateral construction, and septic system abandonment, or for financing green infrastructure improvements on the part of local entities storm water pollution controls. Please contact DEFA staff for more information about these available programs.

Linked Deposit

The linked deposit program is a mechanism for financing certain WPCLF projects. In general, linked deposits are available to private organizations and individuals for nonpoint source projects. What makes linked deposits different from a loan for nonpoint source activities is instead of borrowing directly from the WPCLF, a linked deposit loan is made to the applicant through a private lending institution at a below-market interest rate. The reduced interest rate for the loan is supported by a WPCLF-funded certificate of deposit with the lender.

Linked deposits can be used on a wide variety of projects, such as home sewage treatment system replacements, agriculture best management practices, urban storm water runoff controls, stream corridor restoration, forestry and land development best management practices.

Linked deposits projects typically follow these basic steps. Assistance from the WPCLF – both in terms of funding and technical assistance – is available for each of these steps.

Development — A Management Plan is developed as a collaborative effort between Ohio EPA and interested local groups (e.g., county Soil and Water Conservation Districts, local health departments, etc.) or individuals working on the linked deposit project. Also, a Memorandum of Understanding is developed, then signed by Ohio EPA and the interested party(ies). Finally, to establish the “links” in the linked deposit system, local banks are contacted (either by Ohio EPA or by the interested party) and a Participating Bank Agreement between the bank, Ohio EPA and the Ohio Water Development Authority (OWDA) is prepared.

Implementation — When the Management Plan is approved and the Memorandum of Understanding and Participating Bank Agreements are in place, individual linked deposit loans can then be awarded. The homeowner or the landowner develops an individual project plan and obtains a Certificate of Qualification from the interested party, such as the local Health Departments. With the Certificate of Qualification in hand, the homeowner or the landowner applies for a loan from one of the local participating banks.

If you would like funding for development or implementation of linked deposit projects, the first step is to submit a project nomination. Submitting a nomination is not a formal application or a commitment on your part, but rather a nomination helps Ohio EPA ensure that funds will be available for your project when you need them, if you decide to proceed. Typically, we accept nominations during the month of August, and WPCLF nomination forms are available on our website.

Other Funding Resources

Although Ohio EPA cannot endorse, sanction or guarantee the accuracy of information found on external websites, we think you might find these outside links useful. When you select a link to an external website, you are leaving Ohio EPA's website and are subject to the privacy, security and accessibility policies of the owners/sponsors of the external site. If you have any problems accessing or printing information from these external websites, please let us know.

Ohio Water Development Authority (OWDA)

To provide financial assistance for environmental infrastructure from the sale of municipal revenue bonds through loans to local governments in Ohio and from issuance of industrial revenue bonds for qualified projects in Ohio. OWDA offers variety of low interest loans for wastewater, drinking water and storm water projects.

Rural Community Assistance Program (RCAP)

The Ohio RCAP is a nonprofit organizations working to ensure that rural and small communities throughout Ohio have access to safe drinking water and sanitary wastewater disposal. Ohio RCAP is part of the Great Lakes RCAP - a national network of regional non-profit agencies that provide technical assistance to help small communities address their drinking water, wastewater and community development needs.

Ohio Public Works Commission (OPWC)

Administers the State Capital Improvement Program which provides loan and grant assistance to municipalities for water and wastewater infrastructure.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)

The Office of Community Development administers Community and Economic Development programs that provide federal and state funding to communities to address a variety of needs. The Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) administers the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs in Ohio. They offer many programs related to water, wastewater, and storm water infrastructure funding. More information can be found on ODSA’s website (see link above).

Small Communities Environmental Infrastructure Group (SCEIG)

The Small Communities Environmental Infrastructure Group (SCEIG) is an association of federal and state agencies, local governments and groups, service organizations, and educational institutions designed to help small communities in meeting their environmental infrastructure needs.

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)

The Appalachian Regional Commission is a federal-state partnership that works with the people of Appalachia to create opportunities for self-sustaining economic development and improved quality of life.

U.S. Department of Agriculture - Rural Development (USDA-RD)

USDA Rural Development forges partnerships with rural communities, funding projects that bring housing, community facilities, business guarantees, utilities and other services to rural America. Rural Development works with low-income individuals, State, local and Indian tribal governments, as well as private and nonprofit organizations and user-owned cooperatives. 

U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA)

EDA's mission is to lead the federal economic development agenda by promoting innovation and competitiveness, preparing American regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy. The U.S. Economic Development Administration's investment policy is designed to establish a foundation for sustainable job growth and the building of durable regional economies throughout the United States.

Within the parameters of a competitive grant process, all projects are evaluated to determine if they advance global competitiveness, create jobs, leverage public and private resources, can demonstrate readiness and ability to use funds quickly and effectively, and link to specific and measureable outcomes. To facilitate evaluation, EDA has established investment priorities, including environmentally sustainable development, which states that investments that promote job creation and economic prosperity through projects that enhance environmental quality and develop and implement green products, processes, places, and buildings as part of the green economy. This includes support for energy-efficient green technologies.

Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) — Wastewater Collection and Treatment

The Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) offers financial and technical assistance to public or private applicants for the planning, design, and construction of a wide variety of projects to protect or improve the quality of Ohio's rivers, streams, lakes and other water resources. In general, WPCLF low interest loans to address and solve wastewater infrastructure challenges are available to public entities (villages, cities, counties and sewer districts) for the following types of projects:

  • wastewater treatment plant improvements/expansion
  • new/replacement sewers
  • excess sewer infiltration/inflow correction
  • facilities for unsewered areas including HSTS systems
  • combined sewer overflow correction

Wastewater projects seeking loans typically follow these basic steps. Assistance from the WPCLF – both in terms of funding and technical assistance – is available for each of these steps.

Planning — Project planning defines the existing situation, selects the cost effective solution, identifies specific steps to implement the solution, and explains the project to the local public. The future success of a project depends on the thoroughness of the work done during this step. Planning for a wastewater project can take as little as one month for very simple projects, or up to one year or more for very complicated projects. WPCLF low interest loans can be used to finance planning activities.

Design — Once a solution is identified through project planning, you need to develop the detail plans and specifications for the work and submit the documents to Ohio EPA for review and issuance of a Permit to Install (PTI). Detailed plans and specifications can take months to develop, depending on the complexity of the project. WPCLF loan interest loans can be used to finance design activities.

Construction — Once a PTI is issued and construction bids are obtained, a WPCLF construction loan can be awarded based on the actual bid costs for the work. During the construction phase, DEFA staff can review project changes as they occur, and provide advice regarding effective use of mitigative measures. Then, for the first year after construction is complete, we will help you make sure your new facilities are operating as planned.

If you would like planning, design or construction funding, the first step is to submit a project nomination. Submitting a nomination is not a formal application or a commitment on your part, but rather a nomination helps Ohio EPA ensure that funds will be available for your project when you need them, if you decide to proceed. Typically, we accept nominations during the month of August, and WPCLF nomination forms are available on our website.

Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) — Storm Water Activities

WPCLF low interest loans for storm water activities are available to public entities (villages, cities, counties and sewer districts) for Phase I and Phase II Storm Water Requirements and activities that directly address water quality problems. Please note that this funding cannot be used to address storm water control/flooding problems.

Storm water projects seeking loans typically follow these basic steps. Assistance from the WPCLF – both in terms of funding and technical assistance – is available for each of these steps.

Planning — Project planning for storm water generally consists of the development of a Storm Water Management Program (SWMP) that meets Ohio Administrative Code 3745-39. Some entities covered by OAC 3745-39 may already have completed the planning step. If not, a WPCLF low interest loan can be used to finance the development of the SWMP.

Design — You may need to develop detail plans and specifications for some of the best management practices proposed in the SWMP. In addition, some entities may need to develop a storm water utility system or modifying an existing utility structure to incorporate a method to collect fees and pay for storm water practices. WPCLF loans may be used to finance both of these activities.

Construction — Once the SWMP is approved by Ohio EPA, best management practices are designed and construction bids are obtained, a WPCLF construction loan can be awarded based on the actual bid costs for the work. During the construction phase, DEFA staff can review project changes as they occur and provide advice as needed. Then, for the first year after construction is complete, we will help you make sure your new facilities are operating as planned.

If you would like planning, design or construction funding, the first step is to submit a project nomination. Submitting a nomination is not a formal application or a commitment on your part, but rather a nomination helps Ohio EPA ensure that funds will be available for your project when you need them, if you decide to proceed. Typically, we accept nominations during the month of August, and WPCLF nomination forms are available on our website.

Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) — Nonpoint Source Water Pollution

WPCLF low interest loans for nonpoint source activities are available to both public entities (villages, cities, counties and sewer districts) and private entities (e.g, non-profit organizations, private companies, individuals, etc.) for the following types of projects:

  • agriculture/silviculture improvements and best management practices
  • wellhead protection
  • landfill closure
  • stream corridor restoration/protection
  • hazardous waste cleanup (brownfields)

Nonpoint source projects seeking loans typically follow these basic steps. Assistance from the WPCLF – both in terms of funding and technical assistance – is available for each of these steps.

Planning — Project planning defines the existing situation, selects the best solution, identifies specific steps to implement the solution, and explains the project to the local public, if needed. The future success of a project depends on the thoroughness of the work done during this step. Planning for a nonpoint source project can take as little as one month for very simple projects, or up to one year or more for very complicated projects. Sometimes, other Ohio EPA divisions, such as the Division of Materials and Waste Management, the Division of Drinking and Ground Waters, or the Division of Environmental Response and Remediation, may be dictating the requirements for project planning. WPCLF loans can be used to finance planning activities.

Design — Once a solution is identified through project planning, you may need to develop detail plans and specifications for the work. Depending on the solution to be implemented, detailed design may not be necessary. If needed, WPCLF loans can be used to finance design activities.

Implementation — Once bids for the cost to implement the work are obtained, a WPCLF construction loan can be awarded based on the actual bid costs for the work. During the construction phase, DEFA staff can review changes that occur and provide advice as needed.

If you would like planning, design or construction funding, the first step is to submit a project nomination. Submitting a nomination is not a formal application or a commitment on your part, but rather a nomination helps Ohio EPA ensure that funds will be available for your project when you need them, if you decide to proceed. Typically, we accept nominations during the month of August, and WPCLF nomination forms are available on our website.

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP)

Created in 2000, the Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP) counters the loss of ecological function and biological diversity that jeopardizes the health of Ohio’s water resources. This program uses interest monies from WPCLF “sponsor” projects to fund both preservation and restoration of aquatic habitat to accomplish this goal.

Recently, the WRRSP became a two-year program. We did this to take the current processes for awarding WRRSP projects and spread them out over a two year period instead of one. With this change, the implementer prepares the Restoration/Protection Plan, Ohio EPA reviews and approves the Plan, and the implementer and Ohio EPA complete the work on the Environmental Covenant(s) and other related program documents in Year One. The goal is to have a group of projects that have been reviewed and approved, and are poised to be awarded with a sponsoring loan by the end of Year One. If the project has not advanced to the point of receiving all of its approvals by the end of the first year, it will be removed from funding consideration.In Year Two, Ohio EPA will actually award the WRRSP project funding along with the WRRSP project sponsor’s loan.

Water Supply Revolving Loan Account (WSRLA)

The Water Supply Revolving Loan Account (WSRLA) provides financial assistance for the planning, design and construction of improvements to community water systems and non-profit non-community public water systems. The program is jointly managed by DEFA and Ohio EPA's Division of Drinking and Ground Waters.

FTP Instructions

How to send large files to Ohio EPA users


2018 Draft Drinking Water Program Management Plan

WPCLF

WSRLA

WRRSP

  • 2017 WRRSP Nomination Form (Word) (PDF)

HSTS

Fact Sheets/General Information

Rules

Sewer and Water Rate Survey

The purpose of the annual Sewer and Water Rate Survey is to collect and publish Ohio residential sewer and water rates. The Economic Analysis Unit annually surveys sewer and water rates charged by Ohio cities, villages and special districts during the prior calendar year. Annual rates are calculated for residential customers within municipal limits given an assumed monthly water consumption level of 7,756 gallons (or 1,037 cubic feet) per household. Rate calculations do not include charges levied through income or property taxes. Historic survey data and sewer and water rates for more than 500 cities, villages and districts during the 1984-2011 periods are available online at Ohio EPA's Office of Fiscal Administration webpage. Contact economic.analysis@epa.ohio.gov to receive a copy of the survey by email or call (614) 644-3760 to receive a hard copy or request additional information.

Community's Guide to the Ohio Water Pollution Control Loan Fund

Community's Guide to the Ohio Water Pollution Control Loan Fund

The guide is designed to give you an overall view of Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) program requirements, and guide you through the steps as we proceed through the WPCLF process together. At the end of each section, we have included a checklist to assure that important, but not always readily apparent, tasks are completed at the right time and in the right order. 

 


Information regarding these interest rates and discounts may be found in Appendix E of the current WPCLF Program Management Plan. See page 17 of the plan for a description of the additional subsidies available to disadvantaged communities. Interest Rate Determination based on Program Year 2016 Benchmarks.


WPCLF Standard Interest Rate

The standard Water Pollution Control Loan Fund standard interest rate is determined monthly based on an average of The Bond Buyer 20 General Obligation Bond Index less 125 basis points. The average is determined using the GO Bond rates from the eight Fridays ending with the second Friday of the previous month. The interest rate for planning and design loans will be the standard interest rate unless the applicant qualifies for a lower interest rate.

Small Community Interest Rate

The small community long-term interest rate will be 0.5 percent less than the standard long-term interest rate.

A small community is defined here as any incorporated area with a population of 5,000 or less, OR any applicant that has a current project service population of 5,000 or less and that charges the entire debt for the project solely to the project service population. Projects may not be broken arbitrarily into smaller service areas for the purpose of receiving the lower interest rate.

Planning and Design Loan Interest Rate

Planning and Design loans are available at the same interest rates that the applicant would qualify for (standard, small community or hardship). The repayment period is normally up to a maximum of five years.

Hardship Interest Rate

To further reduce the cost of developing and constructing wastewater facilities, the following interest rates are available to qualifying applicants:

  • Communities with a service population equal to or less than 2,500 AND with a median household income of $48,750 or less will receive an interest rate of zero percent.

  • Communities with a service population between 2,500 and 10,000 AND with a median household income of $44,425 or less will receive an interest rate of 1.0 percent.

The median household income benchmarks may be reviewed and revised annually by Ohio EPA.

A community is defined here as any incorporated area OR any applicant with a current project service population within the noted ranges that charges the entire debt for the project solely to the project service population. Projects cannot be arbitrarily broken into smaller service areas for the purpose of receiving the lower interest rate. 

Home Sewage Treatment System Improvements

Municipalities (counties, cities, villages) may wish to establish a program to provide loans to private individuals for upgrading on-lot sewage disposal systems. When implemented in conjunction with local health departments, the municipality may borrow from the WPCLF to capitalize its loan program, and will receive an interest rate of 0 percent for WPCLF loans with terms of up to 10 years.

Linked Deposit

Linked deposit assistance may be available to private borrowers for a variety of water quality activities, such as agricultural nonpoint source water pollution control, home sewage treatment system improvements, and forestry best management practices.

Linked deposit borrowers generally receive an interest rate from participating banks which equals the bank's normal interest rate minus the interest rate discount the WPCLF gives the bank when it invests WPCLF funds with the bank.

The WPCLF linked deposit investment rate with participating banks will be up to 5.0 percent less than the Treasury Notes and Bonds interest rate would be for a note with a term of years equal to the term of the linked deposit loan. Where the federal note rate is not high enough to support the full 5.0 percent reduction, the discount will be reduced accordingly but in no case will Ohio EPA's investment in the participating bank be less than 0 percent. The effective rate to the borrower will depend upon the bank's normal rate structure, and the amount of the WPCLF discount available.

Interest Rate Discounts

An applicant may receive more than one discount on a construction loan, but the total interest rate for the construction loan will not be less than 0.2 percent. Interest rate discounts are available for the following categories.

Septage Receiving Facilities

As an incentive for public owners of treatment facilities to include equipment designed to receive, treat, and dispose of septage, the WPCLF offers a reduction to a recipient's basic interest rate when it is borrowing from the WPCLF to improve other wastewater facilities.

A recipient receiving a WPCLF loan for wastewater facilities construction may also sponsor its own septage receiving facilities project as a part of the wastewater facilities loan. The WPCLF loan interest payments will be reduced to provide savings equal to the as-bid principal and interest costs of the septage receiving facilities. There is no obligation for the recipient to repay the cost of the septage project. The savings provided are exclusive of any capitalized interest costs or loan fees.

Those communities that are not borrowing for other wastewater facilities improvements may receive a WPCLF loan for their septage receiving proposals. For facilities that have the primary purpose of receiving, treating and disposing of septage, the recipient will receive an interest rate of 2.0 percent.

Failed Non-Conventional Technology

Ohio EPA continues to encourage the development and implementation of non-conventional (innovative) technology. We recognize that there are benefits and risks involved in using these newer technologies. To that end, if the approved non-conventional treatment components fail, the WPCLF will forgive the interest on the remaining portion of the WPCLF loan attributable to the non-conventional technology and make available a zero percent loan for any qualifying facilities necessary to correct the non-conventional technology failure.

Conversion from Class B to Class A Sludge Production

To encourage municipalities to convert from the production of Class B sludge to Class A sludge, applicants with no existing sludge production facilities that construct new Class A sludge facilities or applicants with existing Class B sludge production facilities that convert to Class A sludge facilities will receive an up to 0.2 percent discount from their loan interest rates, except that the total value of the discount cannot exceed the cost of the incremental facilities needed to produce Class A sludge.

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP)

A recipient receiving a WPCLF loan for wastewater facilities construction may also sponsor a WRRSP project as a part of its wastewater facilities loan. A portion of the interest due for the WPCLF loan will be advanced to the implementer of the WRRSP project to pay for the implementation of qualifying actions to protect or restore water resource habitats. There is no obligation for the recipient or the implementer to repay the cost of the WRRSP project.

Either by themselves or in conjunction with other projects which are committed to be undertaken, WRRSP projects must provide complete protection or restoration of aquatic habitat sufficient to meet or protect the designated uses of the benefited water resource as defined under Ohio Water Quality Standards. Projects must address the physical and/or biological factors which have been identified to be among the primary reasons for the water body not fully attaining its designated aquatic life use criteria, or which constitute a threat to full attainment of the designated aquatic life use criteria.

Sponsors may participate in the WRRSP by undertaking projects themselves, or by implementing the project through a not-for profit organization such as a land trust, park district, or other entity with the ability to protect and manage the maintenance of the water resources.

The WPCLF will provide the funds for the cost of the approved WRRSP project. Additionally, the interest rate for the sponsor's wastewater facilities project will be reduced by up to 0.1 percent, but the overall rate of the sponsoring loan will not be less than 0.2 percent.

Green Project Reserve (GPR) Discount

Ohio EPA will offer a discount for projects which implement Green Project Reserve (GPR) benefits to water quality and the environment. The GPR discount will be available to all four GPR categories in the Federal guidance including:

  1. Green Infrastructure;

  2. Water Efficiency;

  3. Energy Efficiency; and

  4. Environmentally Innovative.

Projects which include a green component of at least $250,000, and the green component is 25 percent or more of the project construction cost, will receive a 0.1 percent discount on the entire loan amount. This discount will be available only to WPCLF eligible construction loans with a 20-year term, or CSO projects that qualify for a 30-year term that include green components.

If you have questions, please call the Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance at (614) 644-2798.

 

Phone: (614) 644-2798

Fax: (614) 644-3687

Email Webmaster

Physical address:
Ohio EPA - DEFA
Lazarus Government Center
50 W. Town St., Suite 700
Columbus, Ohio 43215

Mailing address:
Ohio EPA - DEFA
Lazarus Government Center
50 W. Town St., Suite 700
P.O. Box 1049
Columbus, Ohio 43216-1049 

Administrative Support

     

Rouch, Jerry

Assistant Chief

(614) 644-3660

McKinney, Becky

Program Administrator

(614) 644-3636

Limbert, Travis

Administrative Professional

(614) 644-2827
     

Project Coordination Unit

     
Cica, Vlad
Section Manager (614) 644-2276
Spurbeck, Kevin Supervisor (614) 644-3645
Vacant
Supervisor  
Liston, Marcus
Project Coordinator
(614) 705-1015

Blanchard, Dan

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3642

Kelly, Donovan (Mike)

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3644

Pierce, Adam
Project Coordinator (614) 644-3673

Mentzer, Judy

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3649

Walkenspaw, Amy

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3652

Vacant

Project Coordinator

 

Mariani, Mary

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3650

Yade, Paula

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3648

Vacant

Project Coordinator

Saunders, Vicki

Project Coordinator

(614) 644-3653

Smith, David
Project Coordinator (614) 644-3665
Hogan, Monica
Project Coordinator
(614) 728-1222
     

Environmental Engineering Unit

     

Malone, Steve

Section Manager

(614) 644-3663

Bernstein, Jon

Supervisor

(614) 644-3715

Vacant Supervisor  

Lin, Wen-Tong

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3678

Dragovich, Joe

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3710

Laake, Ryan

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3669

Mbah, Valentine

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3668

Al-Jamal, Samih

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3674

Fickle, Gretchen

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3672

Deniro, Dennis

Project Engineer

(614) 644-3708

Vacant

Project Engineer

 

     

Environmental Planning Unit

     
Malone, Steve Section Manager (614) 644-3663
Buckinger, Judy Supervisor (614) 644-3662
Vacant
Supervisor  
Halterman, Dan Project Planner (614) 644-3658
Hauser, Debbie
Project Planner (614) 644-3711
Merchant-Masonbrink, Linda
Project Planner (614) 644-3656
McLean, Rose Project Planner (614) 644-3664
Spangler, Julie
Project Planner (614) 644-3661
Hinkle, Kevin Project Planner (614) 644-3712

Adkins, Angela

Project Planner

(614) 644-3651

Jellick, Joe Project Planner (614) 644-3667
Vacant Project Planner
Harcarik, Tom Project Planner (614) 644-3639
Schultz, Eric Project Planner (614) 644-3713
Vacant
Project Planner

     

$1.62 billion

total savings to Ohioans.

$7.2 billion

invested in Ohio.

621

Ohio entities served.

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Interest Rates

The following interest rates will be in effect in July, 2017
WPCLF/WSRLA Standard Entity  2.00% 
WPCLF/WSRLA Small Systems 1.50% 
WSRLA Affordability Pt. Systems  1.50% 
WPCLF Hardship Community  1% or 0% 
WPCLF Local Loan Capitalization Program (10 years) 0% 
WPCLF/WSRLA Linked Deposit  Refer to the Program Management Plan 
Note: WPCLF/WSRLA construction loans are typically for 20 years, unless noted in the PMP. Shorter term planning and design loans are available.